Tony Romo is Now a Quarterback Whisperer

Brian Giuffra
Tony Romo.
Tony Romo. / Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images
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Tony Romo has lived a privileged existence post-NFL retirement. Seemingly everything he touches turns to gold. But can the prognosticating broadcaster/aspiring pro golfer transition his talents to NFL QB whisperer? It appears so.

In an interview with SI's Albert Breer, Bills QB Josh Allen revealed that Romo gave him some advice during an extended conversation in Miami during Super Bowl week. Apparently, Allen not only soaked in the advice on throwing mechanics, he's also put it into action with early returns proving positive.

"“I got to talking with him about mechanics and keeping your head on the same plane, same axis, and kind of rotating around it, keeping your left arm super tight, and finding a way to throw the same exact way out of any position, whether your feet are set or not. That’s really been paying off. It’s been a good thing for me, and it’s gonna continue to be something I’ll work on.”"

Romo was a four-time Pro Bowler and has put his quarterback IQ on full display as the lead NFL analyst for CBS. There was talk when he initially retired that he was interested in coaching and he confirmed that interest in 2019, saying "I’m sure one day I’ll coach." While this isn't a full foray into coaching, it is a first step.

Just imagine how many QBs are going to want to pick Romo's brain if Allen suddenly takes a big step forward as a passer this season? Allen was dead-last in the NFL in completion percentage in 2019 (58.2%). A more consistent throwing motion, which Romo helped Allen identify as an issue and provided advice on how to fix it, should help. Of course, Allen's work in the offseason with quarterback coach Jordan Palmer will also play a role in any improvement we see, but Romo is the sexier name and will definitely get some of the credit.

Imagining Tony Romo as a quarterback whisperer doesn't take prophetic vision. He already offers insights into QB mechanics and decision-making during broadcasts. He also understands multiple different NFL offenses enough to consistently and accurately predict plays. That combination would make him a top QB coach candidate for multiple NFL teams. Maybe he's holding out for the perfect fit, or maybe he prefers earning big money as a broadcaster, but in the meantime he can continue to hone his craft by giving advice to young QBs. If a couple show improvement, it could be the latest goldmine strike for a retiree who can't stop winning off the field.

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