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Tom Brady's Social Team Must Not Watch Much NFL Football

FOXBOROUGH, MASSACHUSETTS - SEPTEMBER 08: Tom Brady #12 of the New England Patriots reacts as he runs onto the field before the game against the Pittsburgh Steelers at Gillette Stadium on September 08, 2019 in Foxborough, Massachusetts. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Tom Brady's Social Media Team made it known that the greatest quarterback of all time was displeased with last night's Tennessee Titans-Jacksonville Jaguars game.

Considering how many cooks were in the kitchen for those two missives, the NFL should be worried about a significant drop in ratings.

Brady's obvious motivation was to address the rampant offensive holding penalties that have taken over the league early this season. Do you think he wants to see a big New England Patriots drive derailed because one of his offensive lineman -- maybe the one with the sweatiest butt -- got too handsy with a defender? No way.

Now, let's set aside the obvious point that Brady is not the best messenger on this subject. Perhaps no other quarterback is treated as carefully and opposing defenders have long known that even heavy breathing in his general vicinity would more than likely result in a flag. Let's set aside how vocal he is with officials when he believes he deserves a call and, strangely, how some have been seen to embarrassingly capitulate to his wishes.

In a way, Brady's realization that a Thursday Night Football game is unwatchable is perfect US Weekly fodder. Celebrities: They're Just Like US. They recoil in terror at the disastrous product that is mid-week football. His frustration may have been born out of a new issue, but it left him in the same place as so many who have sought out the sweet reprieve of a school-night tilt and failed to be entertained.

It's no secret that the NFL has a problem. That problem is poised to get even more noticeable and painful during primetime. So many of Brady's colleagues won't be able to show up and be productive on game-days. Astoundingly, there are only a dozen people in the world who can play quarterback well, which makes Garnder Minshew's coming-out party all the more impressive.

Things are going to get better before they get worse. Officials may stop calling so many holding penalties. But unless they can line up under center and lead multiple touchdown drives in a given game, the interminable slog of punting and checkdowns is going to continue under the brightest lights.

My simple advice to Brady and those helping his social media empire is to focus on what they can control: winning Super Bowls and whipping up dad-joke memes. Leave the masochism of watching non-Patriots football to everyone else.