No One Is Stopping You From Watching 'Gone With the Wind'

Stephen Douglas
AMPAS "Hollywood's Greatest Year" Screening Of "Gone With The Wind"
AMPAS "Hollywood's Greatest Year" Screening Of "Gone With The Wind" / Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images
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Gone With the Wind has been removed from the HBO Max streaming service according to The Hollywood Reporter. The news was confirmed by a bunch of people offended that Warner was treading on their rights to watch the Best Picture from 1939 that romanticized slavery.

The intersection of Gone With the Wind fans and Twitter users (it is trending!) is apparently very prominent. And now some are convinced - or trying to convince others - that the the film is gone forever. The truth is, you can still watch one of the most famous movies ever. No spoilers, but the movie has been out for over 80 years and HBO Max is going to bring it back.

"HBO Max said Gone With the Wind will eventually return to the service with a "discussion of its historical context and a denouncement of those very depictions" of Black people and slavery."

And if a brief reminder that slavery was bad is just too much for a viewer to bear, there are a few other ways you can watch Gone With the Wind. According to a search on my Roku device, there are seven different options to stream Gone With the Wind for anywhere between $2.49 and $3.99. If you want to watch it on all your devices until the end of time, you can purchase a digital download for $9.99, which will be easy to afford once you have canceled your HBO Max subscription in a fit of outrage. And if you're still worried about the PC police finding it on your computer, you can purchase the two-disc DVD at any major retailer for $5. Then you can hold it while you sleep and dream about the Reconstruction Era you most likely were not alive for.

Now that we've figured that out, just how worried should we be about cancel culture coming for all our favorite problematic material? If you are sensitive to change? VERY! If Gone With the Wind is any indication, people may be briefly and slightly inconvenienced. That movie will not actually go away or be erased, but you might have to sit through a trigger warning before consuming it. That may seem unfair, un-American, but if you could just for a brief moment think about why this thing is considered problematic in the first place. Then you might realize it's a small price to pay compared to whatever the actual victimized people went through.

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