WWE CEO Nick Khan Defends Vince McMahon's Return In Cringeworthy Bill Simmons Interview

Ryan Phillips
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Bill Simmons had WWE CEO Nick Khan on his podcast Wednesday and the conversation felt kind of gross. Khan went to bat for WWE owner and chairman Vince McMahon and defended his return to the company after several months away. McMahon announced his retirement in July of 2022 after sexual misconduct allegations surfaced.

Khan completely defended McMahon and his return to the company and the interview was awkward at times. The clip below is peak cringe.

That's just tough to listen to. It's incredible spin from a company man.

It's worth noting, McMahon used his controlling interest in the company to change the board rules and force his way back in. In January, the WWE Board of Directors unanimously voted him back in. As part of the move, three directors were removed to make room for McMahon and two of his allies. Two other board members resigned at the same time.

Khan glossed over that in the interview and tried to explain it away as basic housekeeping. He also claimed that anyone who thought McMahon was actually retiring were foolish and that people seem to like it when celebrities go away for a few months after a scandal then come back.

Perhaps most damning, rather than address the sexual misconduct allegations and millions in hush money payments made to McMahon's accusers, Khan acted like it was much ado about nothing. He completely glossed over them, which is no different than excusing them.

Simmons challenged Khan at times, and allowed him the room to make himself look worse. The episode was a great chance for Khan to come out strongly against McMahon's actions while defending his return to the company, he chose a different path. It felt like Simmons got exactly what he wanted, as Khan's performance will be controversial.

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