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Mark Schlereth Compares NFL Run Game to Raising Kids

Leonard Fournette
Leonard Fournette | Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

"Establishing the run" is a very contentious subject among NFL fans. The concept is simple: one side argues that teams have to run the ball, regardless of their success in doing so, in order to keep the defense guessing and help set up the passing game. The other side argues that it's the definition of insanity to run the ball over and over again when it's not working under the guise of making passing easier. Especially in today's NFL, when gaining yards through the air has never been easier or more prolific, running the ball to set up the pass seems backwards.

I, personally, fall into the camp of "do whatever's working." Bold, I know. Mark Schlereth, on the other hand, is a lineman-turned-broadcaster who is very much in favor of establishing the run. Schlereth was on the call with Adam Amin during Saturday afternoon's Buccaneers-Lions game and explained why he wanted Bruce Arians and Tampa Bay to keep running the ball using an... odd simile.

Some context: at this point in the game, Tom Brady had completed three of four passes for 74 yards and a touchdown to Rob Gronkowski, while Leonard Fournette had picked up 11 yards on three carries. Immediately after Schreleth's speech, Brady hit Chris Godwin for a 47-yard completion on a play-action pass.

I am no parent, so I cannot speak to the validity of comparing spending time with one's children when they're aggravating to establishing the run in a football game. I can only say that Schreleth's kids were probably thrilled to hear Dad talk about how sometimes you just gotta spend time with your children even when you really don't want to on national television.

In terms of the overall argument, there probably isn't a right answer. But at the time of writing, Brady has 216 yards passing and two touchdowns in less than two quarters of football. I don't really think the Bucs need to establish any run when their QB is cooking like that. But, then again, think of the children!